Thursday, June 28, 2012

BRIC's population in US metros

Aaron (Urbanophile) has done this analysis showing how many Brazilians, Russians, Indians and Chinese are living in US metropolitan areas. We are not as many as I thought and we are by far fewer when compared to other BRIC countries. Click here to take a closer look.

Total Brazil born population by metro (2010)
[image credit: Urbanophile]

Soundtrack: Tim Maia

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Monday, June 18, 2012

"Lost jobs, broken marriages"

That's a great title for a paper!


"This paper examines the impact of both husbands’ and wives’ job displacement on the risk that the marriage ends in divorce. Using Swedish-linked employee–employer data [...] Over a 12-year period, the excess risk of divorce among couples’ in which the husband was displaced was 13% and statistically significant. The estimated impact of wives’ job displacements was of almost the same size, but not statistically significant."


related paper: The Rise and Fall of Divorce: A Sociological Extension of Becker's Model of the Marriage Market

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Urban Picture

Brasília from above (via emBrasilia)

by the way, I’m finally back to Brasília  and I'm not sure if I like it 




Soundtrack:  retrato pra iá iá

Thursday, June 14, 2012

3D Density Map

Alasdair Rae came up with this new 3D Density Map of China, and according to this Hu Huanyong line 43% of the Chinese territory concentrate 94% of the population (it has been like this since 1935).

ps. And here is a nice gift for 3D Maps fans.
[image credit: Alasdair Rae]

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

What is on a Demographer’s Mind?

A worldwide survey conducted among IUSSP members (970 demographers) shows what is on Demographers’ Minds. A nice paper (via)!

And the prize for 'the most important population issue' goes to 'Population Aging'!  'Urbanization' got the second place, except in Europe (Figure 2).

Figure 2: What do demographers think are the most important problems in their country of residence? Percentages of demographers who think a problem is very important
[click to enlarge image]
 
Image source

Monday, June 4, 2012

US Newspapers, 1690-2011

Growth of newspapers across the US  1690-2011 (via flowing data)


Data sources: Chronicling America collection, Library of Congress, Urban population estimates from NASA

Data visualization by the Rural West Initiative, Bill Lane Center for the American West, Stanford University
Credits: Dan Chang, Krissy Clark, Yuankai Ge, Geoff McGhee, Yinfeng Qin and Jason Wang